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2018 Indigenous Research Conference

NPM 8th Biennial International Indigenous Research Conference 
13 - 16 November 2018

Waipapa Marae and Owen G. Glenn Building
University of Auckland
Tāmaki Makaurau – Auckland, NZ

Abstracts submissions will open in 2017 and Early-bird registrations will be available in early 2018.

NPM is focusing on bringing together another world-class line-up of influential keynotes, presenters, events and research for all those who attend, to contribute towards global Indigenous research transformation.

Māori Engagement in New Zealand’s Extractive Industry

In recent years New Zealand has seen a sharp increase in Extractive Industry (oil, gas and mining) projects. The New Zealand government is strongly supportive of investment in the extractives sector and recently adopted a new code to manage industry in New Zealand’s Exclusive Economic Zone. 

At the same time, there have been high profile demonstrations against mining by environmental groups and iwi/hapū. It is clear, too, that some iwi have been working with industry, particularly in Taranaki. Others have sought a treaty interest in petroleum. 

Whakatipu Rawa Mā Ngā Uri Whakatipu

The challenge for Māori carrying out development is to determine how to balance the drivers of a neo-liberal economic approach with the very ideals and principles that define us as Māori to ensure quality social and environmental outcomes for future generations. Through a previous NPM research project "Whakatipu rawa mā ngā uri whakatipu" the team has developed a prototype decision-making framework for collective assets, which takes into account well-being indices, tikanga Māori and financial measures.

"Ka Tangi te Pīpīwharauroa, Ko te Karere a Mahuru"

The whakataukī - Ka tangi te pīpīwharauroa, ko te karere a Mahuru - speaks to how the pīpīwharauroa’s call signals that spring has commenced and also conveniently provides an analogy that seems appropriate to the current state of te reo Māori. 

It not only invites a consideration of the relationship between the pīpīwharauroa and Mahuru, but also for me, how the notion of ‘tangi’ might be thought to echo in the struggle for Māori language revitalisation. 

Taunakitia Te Marae: Marae as Centres of Excellence - a Te Arawa Perspective

Aneta Morgan (Te Arawa) describes the results of their research project, Taunakitia Te Marae: Marae as Centres of Excellence - a Te Arawa Perspective, the aimof which was to identify and share best practice and aspirations in marae development across Te Arawa marae.

The research, conducted through multiple hui across the rohe, identified three key areas of need that would ensure that marae could be centres of excellence for their people. 

• Rangatahi engagement
• Succession planning
• Te Reo Māori

Te Hiringa o te Tangata

Te Rau Tītapu is an ongoing wānanga project based in and around in the Waipoua Forest Community. It was initiated in late 2011 to study wānanga – as a process not an institution – with the purpose of creating models of 'ideal' wānanga for implementation by iwi communities not just in Te Tai Tokerau, but around the country. 

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