2020 Conference

Search and view the IIRC20 pre-recorded presentations below.
View the IIRC20 Conference Programme here.

Day Two

Author(s) Associate Professor Sonja Macfarlane, Fiona Duckworth and Marie Gibson - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: M
Indigenous Flourishing

The need to reinterpret, reframe and restructure thinking and action towards Māori potential and success (rather than deficit and failure) is critical.

Author(s) Hannah Simmonds - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: M
Indigenous Flourishing

Kaikaikaroro is an attempt to give voice to the significant role played by the three Wānanga in Aotearoa in promoting success for Māori.

Author(s) Dr Marama McDonald - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: M
Indigenous Flourishing

Mindfulness-based interventions (MBI) for rangatahi Māori need to encompass cultural paradigms that recognise the inherent strengths, qualities and perspectives of rangatahi Māori; incorporate Māor

Author(s) Abigail McClutchie - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: N
Indigenous languages and cultures

In 2015, the University of Auckland launched an innovative academic literacy programme: Leadership Through Learning.

Author(s) Dr Sylvia Marcos - IIRC
Day Two
Session: N
Indigenous languages and cultures

Oral traditions are fluid, flexible and malleable. Their signs and references are founded in a polysemy of symbolization, ambiguity, and they function through a host of encoded meanings.

Author(s) Jacob Matapo - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: N
Indigenous languages and cultures

This presentation draws upon one part of a broader research project 'He Vaka' that brings together Māori and Indigenous Pacific worldviews to decolonise spaces and places of learning within the ins

Author(s) Jacoba Matapo - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: N
Indigenous languages and cultures

This presentation draws upon one part of a broader research project 'He Vaka' that brings together Māori and Indigenous Pacific worldviews to decolonise spaces and places of learning within the ins

Author(s) Natalie Talamaivao - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: O
Indigenous Flourishing

Racism is an important determinant of health and a cause of ethnic health inequity in Aotearoa New Zealand and internationally.

Author(s) Anna Adcock - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: O
Indigenous Flourishing

The preterm (born before 37 weeks gestation) arrival of a pēpi (baby/babies) is a disruption in the anticipated journey of whānau (family collectives).

Author(s) Admiral Manganda - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: P
Indigenous languages and cultures

Being relatively embryonic, indigenous entrepreneurship research is evolving to integrate and legitimize indigenous epistemologies, paradigms and narratives as a standalone discipline.

Author(s) Dr Onowa McIvor - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: P
Indigenous languages and cultures

Indigenous language learning and revitalization work is necessarily relational and often territorially-based.

Author(s) Rewi Couch - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: P

Since the 1860s when mahika kai species were vested in the Acclimatisation society for their sporting pleasure, Maori have been unable to participate in a traditional harvest of putakitaki, paradis

Author(s) Tūmanako Fa'aui and Dan Hikuroa
Day Two
Session: Q
Indigenous Innovation

NOTE: We haven't got a video presentation for this paper; but join the discussion.

Author(s) Falaniko Tominiko, Jason Hallie and Helen Gremillion - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: Q
Indigenous Innovation

This presentation examines the role of Talanoa research methodology within the Master of Applied Practice – Social Practice (MAP-SP) programme at Unitec Institute of Technology, designed primarily

Author(s) Ihaka Dunn - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: R
Indigenous Flourishing

There is a growing body of research that links overall mental and physical health and well-being to environmental awareness, engagement and action.

Author(s) Angelique Reweti - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: R
Indigenous Flourishing

Colonial processes have severely disrupted Māori social organisation and attachment to place through land alienation and urban migration.

Author(s) Joni Gordon - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: R
Indigenous Flourishing

An exponentially growing body of literature documents the benefits of mindfulness on mental wellbeing, however, it almost entirely focuses on the benefits that emerge from secular mindfulness from

Author(s) Pamela Santos - IIRC
Day Two
Session: S
Indigenous Flourishing

I got in touch with the importance of the indigenous perspectives in Psychology degree through the Academic-Scientific Tutoring Program and “Amerindian Support Network” (ASN) activities coordinated

Author(s) Koroumatai Kody Pewhairangi - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: S
Indigenous Flourishing

He taonga tuku iho: The relational value of indigenous oral composition informing hapu advancement 

Pewhairangi, Koroumatai Kody

Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi

Author(s) Te Kahuratai Painting - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: S
Indigenous Flourishing

Ka mimiti te puna i Taumārere, ka toto te puna i Hokianga,

Ka toto te puna i Taumārere, ka mimiti te puna i Hokianga.

Author(s) Maui Hudson - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: T
Indigenous languages and cultures

The increasing focus on delivering Vision Mātauranga outcomes through research projects has led to greater Māori participation and the integration of mātauranga within science projects.

Author(s) Dr Sonia Fonua - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: T
Indigenous languages and cultures

Contemporary calls from the Pacific to decolonise and disrupt western systems or practice in the Pacific mirror similar efforts in Aotearoa New Zealand, highlighting the need for Indigenous peoples

Author(s) Mihiata Pirini - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: T
Indigenous Innovation

The Māori Land Court in Aotearoa/New Zealand is responsible for ensuring that Māori land, as defined in Te Ture Whenua Maori Act 1993/The Maori Land Act 1993, remains in Māori ownership.

Author(s) Maui Hudson, Ari Thompson, Phillip Wilcox,Jason Mika, Chris Battershill, Matthew Stott, Robert Brooks, and Lisa Warbick
Day Two
Session: K
Indigenous Economies

The diverse and far-reaching applications of genomic research has made it an indispensable tool in the advancement of science and innovation globally.

Author(s) Lisa Warbrick - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: K
Indigenous Economies

This thesis, from a kaupapa Māori perspective, explores the current eco-system of Māori participation and benefit from commercialisation of genomic research on taonga species.

Author(s) Jason Paul Mika, Kiri Dell, Jamie Newth, Carla Houkamau
Day Two
Session: K
Indigenous Economies

Presently, entrepreneurship and innovation within market economies emphasise hedonic conceptualisations of value, in which consumers, on the one hand, are compelled to maximise their utility (the u

Day Three

Author(s) Teorongonui Josie Keelan - IIRC20
Day Three
Session: A
Covid-19

There has been much controversy during the pandemic about what was seen as an imposition of outside forces on tikanga (customs).

Author(s) Dr Michelle Johansson - IIRC20
Day Three
Session: B
Indigenous languages and cultures

In Aotearoa, the Covid-19 crisis has called to arms our team of five million. We locked our borders and worked hard to protect our people. Now we are working to grow our economy.

Author(s) Ashlea Gillon - IIRC20
Day Three
Session: B
Indigenous languages and cultures

As a new and emerging Kaupapa Māori researcher,my experiences are shaped not only by my whakapapaand my whānau, but also by those who have come before me, and those I have built relationships with.

Author(s) Marcia Leenen-Young - IIRC20
Day Three
Session: B
Indigenous languages and cultures

As a Pacific educator I have often been involved with discussions that have centred on Pacific student achievement at University – both through official meetings and informal ‘water cooler’ convers

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