2020 Conference

Search and view the IIRC20 pre-recorded presentations below.
View the IIRC20 Conference Programme here.

Day Two

Author(s) Dr Donna Cormack - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: A
Covid-19
Author(s) Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: A
Indigenous Flourishing

Aotearoa New Zealand has to date avoided the extreme consequences of COVID-19, which internationally has uncovered how health systems and societies differentially value people and groups.

Author(s) Associate Professor Krushil Watene - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: A
Covid-19
Author(s) Julianne Dumont - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: B
Covid-19

Although many First Nations (FN) communities have incorporated culture into their model

Author(s) Rochelle Menzies - IIRC
Day Two
Session: B
Indigenous Flourishing

Reorienting health towards wellness paradigms offers governments and communities, who are currently experiencing the impact of failing health systems, a positive approach to health that supports in

Author(s) Meri Haami - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: C
Indigenous Innovation

He Whiringa Muka is a doctoral study that examines the relationship between

the Whanganui river, Rānana Marae (meeting place) and waiata (songs). This

Author(s) Bobbie Bigby - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: C
Indigenous languages and cultures

Throughout much of its history as a mainstream global industry, tourism has long had a complicated and often exploitative relationship with Indigenous peoples, traditional cultures and Indigenous c

Author(s) Stacey Ruru, Taniora Maxwell, Mihiterina Williams and Taonga Flavell - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: C
Indigenous Innovation

Over the last 50 years, kapa haka has developed an international profile and has become part of our national consciousness.

Author(s) Dr Nancy Marie Mithlo - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: D
Indigenous Innovation

This fall 2020, a new resource for teaching and learning about Native arts was published – Making History: IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (University of New Mexico Press).

Author(s) Professor Beth Leonard, Olga Skinner, Garrison Tsinajinie and Sheilah Nicholas - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: D
Indigenous Innovation

For many Indigenous scholars, mentoring is a long term, wholistic pathway based in responsibilities and relationships; perhaps, akin to ‘godmother-ing/father-ing’.

Author(s) Morgan Mōrehu Tupaea - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: E
Indigenous Flourishing

Within Aotearoa New Zealand, Māori children are uplifted by the state at disproportionate rates compared to their tauiwi (non-Māori) counterparts.

Author(s) Nicola Harrison - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: E
Indigenous Flourishing

The settler colonial context of Aotearoa New Zealand has been, and continues to be, one that has pathologized Māori whānau (extended family) processes and practices.

Author(s) Fern Miro Smith - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: E
Indigenous Flourishing

Exploring sexuality can be full of possibility, discovery, and pleasure – yet can also be a site where gendered and racialised discourses coalesce in nuanced and complex ways.

Author(s) Symon Palmer - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: F
Indigenous Environments

Aotearoa is faced with declining bioheritage due to invasive species and biosecurity threats. Recognising this, the government has set a target of becoming predator free by 2050.

Author(s) Rāwiri Tinirau - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: F
Indigenous Environments

Wānanga (traditional learning forums) focused on teaching tamariki (children) and rangatahi (youth) to hopu tuna (catch freshwater eels) has led to the consolidation of hapū (cluster of extended fa

Author(s) Dr Kēpa Morgan - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: F
Indigenous Environments

Acknowledgement that Indigenous Knowledge can not be assimilated and readily generalised within reductionist scientific paradigms is emerging.

Author(s) Fiona Wiremu & Mate Heitia - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: G
Indigenous Economies

Indigenous minds are collectivising to resist the persisting inequalities of neo-liberal contestations over the control and politics of kai.

Author(s) Dr Kiri Dell, Dr Chellie Spiller & Dr Nimbus Staniland - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: G
Indigenous Economies

In a world facing increasing global challenges such as climate emergency, wildlife extinction, pollution and poverty, most people recognise the dire need for fundamental societal change, yet, we ar

Author(s) Dr Carla Houkamau, Dr Kiri Dell, Dr Jamie Newth and Dr Jason Mika - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: G
Indigenous Economies

Understanding Māori economic aspirations is a complicated endeavour, with many layers of intra-group diversity to consider.

Author(s) Associate Professor Celeste Pedri-Spade - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: H
Indigenous Innovation

Drawing on theories of Indigenous futurisms and Anishinaabe materiality, the author as artist-researcher presents Material Kwe, a series of five (5) different wearable art ensembles that premiered

Author(s) Dr Moana Nepia - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: H
Indigenous Innovation

For senior Māori artist Selwyn Muru (Ngāti Kuri, Te Aupouri), “Māori art has always been contemporary,” it circulates ideas and remains forever relevant through the ways we think and interact with

Author(s) Xaab Nop Vargas-Vasquez - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: H
Indigenous Innovation

In Ayuujk we have three philosophical and cosmological principles: Käjp Mëtuunën Pujx Metuunën, Näjwiiny jujkyäjtën, Käjp jääy’äjtën.

Author(s) Dawn Pichon Barron & Associate Professor Mera Penehira - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: I
Indigenous Flourishing

TWWoA is the only tertiary institution in Aotearoa currently offering an International Indigenous Doctoral Programme.  Likewise, the only wānanga offering doctoral study.  The degree of Doctor of I

Author(s) Dr Tyron Love & Professor C. Michael Hall - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: I
Indigenous Flourishing

The future looks grim for Māori academics and for the New Zealand universities hoping to recruit them.

Author(s) Aimee Matiu & Tūmanako Fa'aui - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: I
Indigenous Flourishing

Much is written on the importance of engagement with Māori and the value of mātauranga Māori in research relationships.

Author(s) Dr Victoria LaPoe - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: J
Indigenous languages and cultures

As COVID-19 surged, non-Indigenous media had a chronic disease of its own: A lack of Indigenous sources, particularly Native women. This study evaluated the role of gender in U.S.

Author(s) Danielle Lucero - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: J
Covid-19

We will present seven emerging principles identified by Seven Directions, a Center for Indigenous Public Health for developing and implementing an Indigenous

Author(s) Professor Jenny Lee-Morgan - IIRC
Day Two
Session: J
Covid-19

This presentation is based on the first phase of the three-year Marae Ora, Kāinga Ora (MOKO) research project, funded by Endeavour Fund, MBIE, and led by Prof Jenny Lee-Morgan (Science Lead).  The

Author(s) Dr Maria Margarita "Marjs" Lavides - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: L
Indigenous Flourishing

There are two key enablers of children’s dignity – functionality and pakikipagkapwa or regarding others as kapwa (fellow human beings).

Author(s) Logan Hamley - IIRC20
Day Two
Session: L
Indigenous Flourishing

This presentation draws on initial finding of my PhD research exploring the ways young Māori men construct their identities and navigate complex social worlds within Auckland, New Zealand.

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