2020 Conference

Search and view the IIRC20 pre-recorded presentations below.
View the IIRC20 Conference Programme here.

Day One Keynote

Author(s) Professors' Jacinta Ruru, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Kyle Whyte, Megan Davis & Charles Menzies
Day One Keynote
Session: A
Indigenous Flourishing

Day Two Keynote

Author(s) Professor Rangi Matamua (Aotearoa) and Dr Kalei Nu'uhiwa (Hawai'i)
Day Two Keynote
Session: A
Covid-19

In the past 30 years indigenous astronomy has undergone a resurgence and this is especially evident in both Hawai’i and Aotearoa.

Day Three Keynote

Author(s) Professor Linda Waimarie Nikora (NPM, Aotearoa) with Professor Papaarangi Reid (Aotearoa, New Zealand), Dr Marcia Anderson (Canada), Professor Keawe’aimoku Kaholokula (Hawaii), Dr Jordan Cory (Australia)
Day Three Keynote
Session: A
Covid-19

From early in 2020, across our planet, Indigenous peoples followed the emerging COVID-19 pandemic with keen interest.

Day One

Author(s) Jo-Ann Archibald Q'um Q'um Xiiem, Jenny Lee-Morgan and Jason De Santolo - IIRC20
Day One
Session: A
Indigenous Innovation

This presentation extends on the work of two previous books that introduced the concepts and practices of Indigenous storywork (Archibald, 2008; Archibald, Lee-Morgan, & De Santolo, 2019).

Author(s) Professor Jarrod Haar, Dr Maree Roche & Dr David Brougham
Day One
Session: B
Indigenous Economies

High-Performance Work Systems (HPWS) are defined by Datta, Guthrie, and Wright (2005) as “systems of human resource (HR) practices designed to enhance employees’ skills, commitment, and productivit

Author(s) Associate Professor Ella Henry - IIRC20
Day One
Session: B
Indigenous Economies

This paper argues that Māori history, culture and values inform the investment philosophy and approach of Māori Asset Holding Institutions (MAHI).

Author(s) Lyn McCurdy & Dr Jason Mika - IIRC20
Day One
Session: B
Indigenous Economies

Organisations are created to fulfil human wants and needs in ways that resemble the prevailing social, cultural, political, economic and moral contexts in which they are embedded (Mika et al., 2020

Author(s) Deborah Heke - IIRC20
Day One
Session: C
Indigenous Flourishing

We, as Māori, are the embodiment of the successes and learnings of our tupuna (ancestors).

Author(s) Ashlea Gillon - IIRC20
Day One
Session: C
Indigenous Flourishing

Ko Hine-Nui-Te-Pō tētahi atua, tētahi tipuna hoki. Hine-Nui-Te-Pō is an ancestor, and one of the biggest, most influential, powerful Māori women in our history as tāngata whenua.

Author(s) Tui Summers - IIRC20
Day One
Session: C
Indigenous Flourishing

Women are under-represented in the social justice leadership literature.

Author(s) Paora Tapsell - IIRC20
Day One
Session: D
Indigenous Flourishing

How can our marae communities and their descendants better shape a future that builds community and environmental resilience in response to climate change?

Author(s) Dr Frances Wyld - IIRC20
Day One
Session: D
Indigenous Environments

This ongoing meta-research project spans three lands using multiple methods to document Indigenous perspectives on climate change and the need for societal change to realign with the sovereign know

Author(s) Margaret Wilkie, Henry Koia, and Christine Roseveare
Day One
Session: D
Indigenous Flourishing

The ManaiaSAFE Forestry School (MFS) was created for safety on many levels in the forest, the most lethal workplace in Aotearoa New Zealand in 2019.

Author(s) Georgia Mclellan - IIRC20
Day One
Session: E
Indigenous Flourishing

The author of this presentation is Georgia McLellan, who has tribal affiliations to Whakatōhea in Ōpōtiki and Ngai Te Rangi in Tauranga.

Author(s) Ashleigh Browne - IIRC20
Day One
Session: E
Indigenous Economies

The Moana Project, led by MetOcean Solutions, is a national research programme that is being conducted over 5 years (2018 – 2023).

Author(s) Daniel Paruru - IIRC20
Day One
Session: E
Indigenous Economies

The Whakatōhea Iwi is located in the Eastern Bay of Plenty community of Ōpōtiki. Although there are over 15,000 registered members, only 10% of its people reside at home.

Author(s) Kiri Solomon - IIRC20
Day One
Session: F
Indigenous Flourishing

Our proposed presentation will focus on the learnings to date from the ‘Māhunga Ake – Heads Up’ research project. This research is being done as part of a PHD supervised by Dr.

Author(s) Dr Erena Wikaira - IIRC20
Day One
Session: F
Indigenous Flourishing

Rongoā Māori is the traditional Indigenous system of healing in Aotearoa.

Author(s) Gabriel Karenhoton Maracle - IIRC20
Day One
Session: F
Indigenous Flourishing

Trauma is one of the spectres of colonization that continues to haunt Indigenous peoples.

Author(s) Paula Bold-Wilson and `Aulola Lino
Day One
Session: G
Indigenous Flourishing

The Unitec Institute of Technology, Bachelor of Social Practice (BSP) (4-year degree) programme is in its 6thyear of delivery.

Author(s) Associate Professor Carla Houkamau, Dr Kiri Dell, Dr Jamie Neweth and Dr Jason Mika - IIRC20
Day One
Session: G
Indigenous Flourishing

Self-efficacy is a belief in one's ability to succeed in a specific situation or accomplish a task (Bandura, 1997) and is one of the most studied constructs in Western psychology, particularly conc

Author(s) Mariaelena Huambachano - IIRC20
Day One
Session: G
Indigenous Flourishing

Indigenous knowledge has been recognised within development since, at least the 1980s, for example, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDGs) highlights the significance of local solut

Author(s) Dr Daniel Hikuroa
Day One
Session: H
Indigenous Environments

What counts as evidence to ensure our coasts, waters, forests and lands are healthy and thriving ecosystems providing a sustainable basis for Indigenous aspirations?

Author(s) Dyanna Jolly - IIRC20
Day One
Session: H
Indigenous Environments

The emerging field of Indigenous impact assessment is under-developed compared to other forms of impact assessment, particularly in terms of its theoretical foundation.

Author(s) Dr Maya Magarati - IIRC20
Day One
Session: I
Covid-19

Historically, indigenous communities have experienced higher rates of infection, severe symptoms, and death than the general population due to the social and cultural determinants of health and ins

Author(s) Mary Bennett - IIRC20
Day One
Session: I
Covid-19

The Covid-19 pandemic has caused significant loss and harm around the world, with an ongoing and serious risk to the health and wellbeing of Indigenous populations.

Author(s) Katrina Potiki Bryant - IIRC20
Day One
Session: I
Covid-19

Taurite Tū is a Kaupapa Māori falls prevention exercise and wellness programme offered to Māori and their whānau.

Author(s) Rāwiri Tinirau & Rachael Tinirau - IIRC20
Day One
Session: J
Indigenous Flourishing

The Whakapapa Research Project, hosted by Te Atawhai o Te Ao, aims to gather whānau narratives from eight whānau, led by a researcher from each whānau.

Author(s) Dr Tanya Allport - IIRC
Day One
Session: J
Indigenous Flourishing

The idea of being ‘safe and well at home’ has taken on an unprecedented importance within the rapidly developing Coronavirus COVID-19 crisis.

Author(s) Miriama Cribb - IIRC20
Day One
Session: J
Indigenous Flourishing

The Whakapapa Research Project, hosted by Te Atawhai o Te Ao, aims to gather whānau narratives from eight whānau, led by a researcher from each whānau.

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